1894 found the United States in a deep depression. The infamous Pullman Strike crippled rail service west of Detroit all the way to the California coast, isolating San Francisco. No trains meant among other things, no mail.
In response, a bicycle mail route was organized totaling 210 miles, divided into 8 relays, and occupying 18 hours. The route offered to carry a letter via bicycle from one end to the other for $0.25.
This patch is a replica of the original stamp present on each letter carried. We retained the misspelling of San “Fransisco” for authenticity.

1894 found the United States in a deep depression. The infamous Pullman Strike crippled rail service west of Detroit all the way to the California coast, isolating San Francisco. No trains meant among other things, no mail.

In response, a bicycle mail route was organized totaling 210 miles, divided into 8 relays, and occupying 18 hours. The route offered to carry a letter via bicycle from one end to the other for $0.25.

This patch is a replica of the original stamp present on each letter carried. We retained the misspelling of San “Fransisco” for authenticity.

Le Chimborazo vu depuis le Plateau de Tapia. In Alexander von Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland. Voyage de Humboldt et Bonpland…Ière partie; relation historique…Paris, F. Schoell, 1810. Snow-capped peaks, high arid plateaus, and deep luxuriant valleys all characterize one of the natural land formations most often associated with South America: the mountain system known as theCordillera de los Andes. From 1799 to 1804, the renowned explorer and naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, accompanied by the botanist Aimé Bonpland, made a scientific excursion to South and Central America collecting numerous plant specimens and studying flora, fauna, and geology. Chimborazo, a formidable extinct volcano of some 22,000 feet, is situated in central Ecuador. In pre-Conquest times, it was located in the northern part of the Inca empire. For a long period, it was considered the highest Andean mountain. (Rare Book and Special Collections Division)

Le Chimborazo vu depuis le Plateau de Tapia. In Alexander von Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland. Voyage de Humboldt et Bonpland…Ière partie; relation historique…Paris, F. Schoell, 1810. Snow-capped peaks, high arid plateaus, and deep luxuriant valleys all characterize one of the natural land formations most often associated with South America: the mountain system known as theCordillera de los Andes. From 1799 to 1804, the renowned explorer and naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, accompanied by the botanist Aimé Bonpland, made a scientific excursion to South and Central America collecting numerous plant specimens and studying flora, fauna, and geology. Chimborazo, a formidable extinct volcano of some 22,000 feet, is situated in central Ecuador. In pre-Conquest times, it was located in the northern part of the Inca empire. For a long period, it was considered the highest Andean mountain. (Rare Book and Special Collections Division)

Carnival Havana 1952. Half tone and lithographed poster. 1952. Carnival originated in Europe in the Middle Ages to portend the start of Christian Lent and symbolically celebrate the death of winter and the beginning of spring. In the Luso- Hispanic world, it is observed annually throughout the Americas and the Iberian Peninsula, with noteworthy celebrations in Rio de Janeiro, Salvador (Bahia), Port of Spain, and New Orleans. (Poster Collection, Prints and Photographs Division)

Carnival Havana 1952. Half tone and lithographed poster. 1952. Carnival originated in Europe in the Middle Ages to portend the start of Christian Lent and symbolically celebrate the death of winter and the beginning of spring. In the Luso- Hispanic world, it is observed annually throughout the Americas and the Iberian Peninsula, with noteworthy celebrations in Rio de Janeiro, Salvador (Bahia), Port of Spain, and New Orleans. (Poster Collection, Prints and Photographs Division)

Calaveras de montón. Número 1. José Guadalupe Posada. Broadside, full sheet, zinc etching. (Mexico: Antonio Vanegas Arroyo, 1910). One of the most popular forms of engravings produced by Posada is the multitude of uninhibited illustrations which he engraved year after year during the last days of October and first days of November when all in Mexico celebrate All Saints’ Day, All Souls’ Day, or most commonly in Mexico, the Day of the Dead. Death has a unique persona in Mexico; in the pre-Hispanic cultures as in the later Christian culture, death was just a further step in life itself, a step which offered a security and serenity markedly contrasting the sufferings and worries which afflict mankind. Life and death complemented each other. To a large extent, the boom in representations of the human skeleton in the twentieth century is due to José Guadalupe Posada. He took the popular traditions and gave them a material form of such expressive vigor that the macabre surrendered to the dynamic and jovial vitality of his images. This dangerous and violent-looking calavera is apparently about the business of creating more calaveras, as the title suggests: piles, heaps, masses of calaveras. One of Posada’s most striking images of skeletons in motion, this print has been used for several different subjects. (Swann Collection, Prints and Photographs Division)

Calaveras de montón. Número 1. José Guadalupe Posada. Broadside, full sheet, zinc etching. (Mexico: Antonio Vanegas Arroyo, 1910). One of the most popular forms of engravings produced by Posada is the multitude of uninhibited illustrations which he engraved year after year during the last days of October and first days of November when all in Mexico celebrate All Saints’ Day, All Souls’ Day, or most commonly in Mexico, the Day of the Dead. Death has a unique persona in Mexico; in the pre-Hispanic cultures as in the later Christian culture, death was just a further step in life itself, a step which offered a security and serenity markedly contrasting the sufferings and worries which afflict mankind. Life and death complemented each other. To a large extent, the boom in representations of the human skeleton in the twentieth century is due to José Guadalupe Posada. He took the popular traditions and gave them a material form of such expressive vigor that the macabre surrendered to the dynamic and jovial vitality of his images. This dangerous and violent-looking calavera is apparently about the business of creating more calaveras, as the title suggests: piles, heaps, masses of calaveras. One of Posada’s most striking images of skeletons in motion, this print has been used for several different subjects. (Swann Collection, Prints and Photographs Division)

challenger23
challenger23:

"Higher, higher!"
Hard to believe it’s been a year since I made this. It was from an old black and white Band-Aid commercial that used this effect when the kids were injured while playing. I put the color bands on and posted it. 
The cool part of this wasn’t just the notes, but that Dain Fagerholm (one of my favorite tumblr artists) contacted me to point out that this is a visual example of multiplexing. 
I could stare at this forever.

challenger23:

"Higher, higher!"

Hard to believe it’s been a year since I made this. It was from an old black and white Band-Aid commercial that used this effect when the kids were injured while playing. I put the color bands on and posted it. 

The cool part of this wasn’t just the notes, but that Dain Fagerholm (one of my favorite tumblr artists) contacted me to point out that this is a visual example of multiplexing

I could stare at this forever.